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SLIGO LIVE REGISTER REVEALS HIGH NUMBER OF JOBLESS.

County has suffered major loss of industrial, service and retail activity under Coalition.

Sligo News File Online.

Despite widespread emigration of families and young people from Sligo records show there are still upwards of 4,600 on the Live Register for the area.

The county has suffered under the Fine Gael-Labour Coalition with a major loss of local industrial, service sector and retail activity.

Young people, many of them refusing to become part of a growing dole queue, have, with families, moved away to look for work in other countries.

Of the number currently on the dole, 2,765 are male and 1,835 female.

The existing working population includes many in low end, relatively poorly paid occupations.

Rural areas of the county are also set to be further depopulated under government measures, which, according to the IFA, provide that only young qualified farmers will be able to obtain EU payments and subsidies, without which it will be virtually impossible for farm owners to survive.

Meanwhile, the government is bringing forward its goal of full employment by 2018 – two years earlier than its previously announced deadline. This will include a target of creating 40,000 new jobs this year, the Taoiseach, Enda Kenny has said. However, Finfacts Business News Centre says Kenny has got his sums wrong by about 60,000 on the increase in employment needed to offset jobs lost during the recession.

As to Sligo, Ballymote-based former junior minister for small business John Perry has said he is in talks about plans to establish a whiskey distillery at Hazelwood House. This follows the launching of a brewery – the White Hag Brewing Company – in Ballymote in 2013.

 

 

SLIGO HUGHES BRIDGE DOWN TO SINGLE LANE FOR NORTHBOUND TRAFFIC.

Lane closure to facilitate on-going hydro-demolition works.

Sligo News File Online.

Hughes Bridge, Sligo 1Sligo County Council has informed motorists that Hughes Bridge will be reduced to a single lane for northbound traffic with effect from lunchtime today, Thursday 15th January. The lane closure, says the authority, will remain in place throughout the weekend and possibly into the early part of next week.

‘The closure will remain in place during the morning and evening peaks in order to facilitate the on-going hydro-demolition works. Accordingly, motorists should allow additional time for delays
during these periods.

‘As always, Sligo County Council and L&M Keatings will endeavour to minimise the effects of the works and we thank you for your continuing co-operation and patience,’ the statement adds.

REPORT SHOWS INCREASED OUTPUT NOT ALWAYS GOOD FOR FARMERS.

‘…an increase of 13% in beef production resulted in a paltry 1% rise in the value of beef exports…’

Sligo News File Online.

Patrick Kent, President, Irish Cattle & Sheep Farmers Association.
Patrick Kent, President, Irish Cattle & Sheep Farmers Association.

ICSA president Patrick Kent has said that the 2014-2015 Bord Bia Export Performance and Prospects report clearly demonstrates that increased output does not always translate into good returns for farmers.

“As we see from these figures, an increase of 13% in beef production resulted in a paltry 1% rise in the value of beef exports, showing that increasing output has been of little value to the economy, and has actually had a negative effect for many farmers. While output increased by 13% last year, beef prices fell by an average of 11%, a completely unsustainable price drop.”

“Bord Bia themselves admit in this report that beef consumption was sluggish across most markets last year, yet farmers are constantly being told that they need to increase output. ICSA is adamant that any future food production strategy must focus on profitability as opposed to increasing output, and these export figures further reinforce that view.”

 

 

On the Agenda – Meeting Municipal District West Sligo, Tubbercurry and Ballymote.

‘Give Sligo attractions full recognition’ – Lundy.

Sligo News File Online.

At the next meeting of the west/south- west Sligo Municipal District Council Councillor Jerry Lundy (FF) is to ask that ‘full recognition be given to the many wonderful attractions Sligo has, including the long running festivals and events that take place each year in the South, East and West of the County’

Councillor Joe Queenan (FF) wants the County Council to extend public lighting to the Castlecove, Frankford Close, Ocean View, Pebble Beach estates in Enniscrone.

Cllr. Margaret Gormley (Ind) wants the county council to install speed ramps in Gurteen View Estate, Gurteen, and to seek to have the childrens’ community playground in Tubbercurry reopened.

Cllr. Dara Mulvey (FG) is to call for a safety issue at the pedestrian crossing outside SuperValu on Main St., Tubbercurry, to be investigated.

The meeting of the council is being held in the Sligo Folk Park, Riverstown at 11 am on 16 January 2015. It is open to the public. 

 

 

 

Youth Guarantee report shows government is failing young people – Reilly.

‘…government has still not kept to the EU Council Recommendation…’

Sligo News File Online.

Sinn Féin Senator and Spokesperson on Youth Affairs Kathryn Reilly has articulated her criticism of the Irish government’s implementation of the Youth Guarantee scheme.

Speaking on the Trade Union report issued today on the scheme, Senator Reilly stated:

“It is a worrying report in that it has highlighted the inadequacies of the Youth Guarantee’s implementation by this government and that it has brought to the surface particular areas where the government is failing our young people.

“One particular issue which I have previously raised, and which is again brought up in this report, is that the Irish government has still not kept to the EU Council Recommendation that calls for offering a quality job, a traineeship, an apprenticeship, or continued education to all unemployed young people aged 18-24 within four months. In some instances it is eight to nine months before one of the above measures is proposed.

“With close to a quarter of Ireland’s young people unemployed, the report has highlighted that for those who do manage to secure an offer of employment, “the quality and type of contract offered… is rather bad, as well as the remuneration received”.

“On previous occasions I have stated that if we are to properly address youth unemployment, we must provide timely and adequate intervention, this must be combined with greater trade union involvement in the implementation and evaluation of the Youth Guarantee as called for by SIPTU in the report.

“Sinn Fein has previously highlighted problems facing Ireland’s youth in our report, ‘Youth Matters: Not for Export’ which contained Sinn Fein’s analysis of critical youth issues and the Youth Guarantee. I am again calling on the Minister for Social Protection to review the implementation of the Youth Guarantee and also to address current issues with those who have limited or no access to the programme, such as young people with disabilities, single parents and carers.”

IF THE PURPLE FLAG SLIGO IS PURSUING IS NOT ABOUT PROMOTION OF ALCOHOL WHAT DOES IT STAND FOR?

Purple Flag project backed by Diageo, one of the largest drinks industry firms in the world.

Sligo News File Online.

If the Purple Flag which Sligo is chasing is not about the promotion of alcohol consumption just what does it represent?

The project is backed by Diageo, one of the largest drinks 
firms in the world, and in Sligo we understand, is set to be supported by the county council with the aid of funds provided by the EU.

From what can be seen in press statements and reports surrounding the project, the emphasis is on the encouragement of a 5pm to 5am nightlife in town centres, which, in Sligo, would mean art galleries, library services, museums and the like being open into the early hours of the morning if the purpose of the programme simply isn’t the furtherance of the pub and night club industry of the area.

We are told the project has the backing of the gardai. Local figures have been pictured at the Town Hall following assessment for the Purple Flag, and announcement that early delivery of the apparently much sought after flag is expected – among those in the photograph, published on the official website of the county council, is the chairperson of the Sligo Municipal Council, Cllr. Tom MacSharry.

Of course, it would be perfectly understandable that there would be some measure of excitement and anticipation of ‘bloom’ if the project was going to lift the town’s wider economy. However, there’s been no mention of how the flag – described as the ‘gold standard for night-time destinations’ – is to bring about the development of new non-alcohol type outlets in Sligo, nor in the least help curtail the plague that is excessive drinking in
the country.

Will late night drinking, it’s wondered turn out to be a magnet
for the young, for trouble in the town centre? What demand will be placed on garda resources to police the town at night, on ambulance services, on hospital facilities?

Does the use of a flag for which the backers include a global drinks industry not constitute a form of drinks advertising, glamorisation of alcohol?  Further, does Sligo really need a drinks industry sponsored symbol to promote the development of its town centre? As well, if the sponsor is a drinks firm, why should it be backed with taxpayers’ money in the form of EU funds, if such is the case. Are there not more deserving causes towards which such funds could go, for example a youth project or the relaunching of the Twist type soup kitchen for needy families of the area?

This is the impact which Alcohol Action Ireland says alcohol consumption is having on health in the country:

88 deaths every month in Ireland are directly attributable to alcohol

There are almost twice as many deaths due to alcohol in Ireland as due to all other drugs combined

Alcohol is a factor in up to one third of all deaths by unnatural causes, according to statistics from one county

Chronic alcohol-related conditions are becoming increasingly common among young age groups. Between 2005 and 2008, 4,129 people aged under 30 were discharged from hospital with chronic diseases or conditions of the type normally seen in older people

Alcoholic liver disease deaths almost trebled (188% increase) between 1995 and 2009

The figures also reveal considerable increases of alcohol liver disease among younger age groups. Among 15-34 -years-olds, the rate of ALD discharges increased by 275%, while for the 35-49 age group, the rate increased by 227%. These increases suggests we
are starting to see the effects of the large increases in alcohol consumption up to 2003.

Alcohol-related admissions to acute hospitals doubled between 1995 and 2008

Alcohol-related deaths also increased during the same period, from 3.8 deaths per 100,000 to 7.1 deaths per 100,000

St Vincent’s Hospital in Dublin figures show a 335pc increase in admissions with alcoholic liver disease between 1995 and 2010

Over 14,000 people were admitted to the liver unit in St Vincent’s Hospital for the treatment of alcohol dependence in 2011.

The harmful use of alcohol is especially fatal for younger age groups and alcohol is the world’s leading risk factor for death among males aged 15-59, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO)

According to the WHO, almost 4 per cent of all deaths worldwide are attributed to alcohol. This is a greater number than deaths caused by HIV/AIDS, violence or tuberculosis

In Ireland, between 2000 and 2004, it was estimated that 4.4 per cent of deaths were caused by alcohol. This figure includes deaths from chronic alcohol-related conditions such as alcoholic liver disease and liver cancer, and accidental and non-accidental deaths while under the influence of alcohol

Alcohol increases the risk of developing more than 60 diseases and medical conditions, even at low levels of consumption

Alcohol is the third leading risk factor for death and disability in the EU after tobacco and high blood pressure

A more than 3% increase in unemployment in the EU is associated with a staggering 28% increase in deaths from alcohol use disorders, according to the WHO

Alcohol and Injuries:

More than one in four of those attending accident and emergency departments have alcohol‑related injuries, almost half of which occurred to people aged under 30 years

Alcohol is a factor in one in four traumatic brain injuries

Alcohol is a factor in 80% of cases of assaulted patients admitted to neurosurgery units

Additional damning evidence (2013) published by Alcohol Action Ireland:

More than half (54%) of 18-75 year old drinkers were classified as harmful drinkers which equates to 1.35 million harmful drinkers in Ireland

75% of all alcohol consumed in Ireland in 2013 was done so as part of a binge drinking session

One in five (21.1%) drinkers engage in binge drinking at least once a week

Almost two thirds (64.3%) of 18-24 year old drinkers consume six or more standard drinks on a typical drinking session

One third (33%) of men and more than one fifth (23%) of women who consumed alcohol in the week prior to the Health Research Board’s Irish Alcohol Diaries 2013 survey consumed more than the HSE low risk drinking guidelines of 16.8 standard drinks for men and 11.2 standard drinks for women

One in eight (13%) men and almost one in ten (9%) women drank their recommended weekly guidelines in one sitting in the week prior to the HRB survey. Among 18-24 year-olds, 28% of men and 22% of women consume weekly guidelines in one sitting

The World Health Organisation’s Global status report on alcohol and health 2014 found that 39% of all Irish people aged 15-years-old and over had engaged in binge drinking, or “heavy episodic drinking”, in the past 30 days. This puts Ireland just behind Austria (40.5%) at the top of the 194 countries studied and well ahead of our neighbours in Britain (28%)

When the 19% of non-drinkers in Ireland were excluded by the WHO, it found that almost two thirds of Irish men (62.4%) and one third of Irish women (33.1%) who drink alcohol had engaged in binge drinking in the previous month, almost half (48.2%) of all drinkers

Over half of all Irish drinkers have a harmful pattern of drinking, according to the SLÁN survey, that’s 4 in 10 women and 7 in 10 men who drink, which amounts to an estimated 1,453,250 adults

In 2013, the average Irish person aged 15+ drank 10.73 litres of pure alcohol

When we consider the fact that one in five adults in Ireland don’t drink alcohol, it means that those who do drink are consuming much more than the average consumption statistics show

Average alcohol consumption in 2010 was 145% higher than the average amount consumed in 1960

Alcohol consumption in Ireland increased by 46% between 1987 (9.8 litres) and 2001 (14.3 litres) when our consumption reached a record high

OECD figures show how alcohol consumption in Ireland almost trebled over four decades between 1960 (4.9 litres) and 2000 (14.2 litres)

Ireland continues to rank among the highest consumers of alcohol in the 26 countries in the enlarged EU.

From 1980 to 2010, average alcohol consumption in Europe decreased by an average of 15 per cent, while consumption in Ireland over that period increased by 24 per cent

Irish adults binge drink more than adults in any other European country, with 44 per cent of  drinkers stating that they binge drink on a regular basis

The highest proportion of binge drinkers is in the 18-29 age group. Young people are also more likely to exceed the weekly low-risk limit for alcohol consumption

Alcohol Action Ireland details of the cost of alcohol abuse:

Alcohol misuse in Ireland is fuelling a growing health and crime crisis that is costing us an estimated €3.7billion a year in health, crime/public order and other ancillary costs, such as work-place absenteeism.

At a time when we need to do more with less, it’s worth remembering that these costs are avoidable costs. According to the Chief Medical Officer of Ireland, a 30% reduction in alcohol-related harm would result in a cost saving to the Exchequer of €1billion.

Alcohol-related harms cost each tax payer in Ireland an estimated  €3,318 a year. And that’s just the financial cost:

88 deaths every month in Ireland are directly attributable to alcohol

One in eleven children in Ireland say parental alcohol use has a negative effect on their lives – that is about 109,684 children

There are 1,200 cases of cancer each year from alcohol in Ireland

One in four deaths of young men aged 15-39 in Ireland is due to alcohol

One in three road crash deaths is alcohol-related

Based on the figures in the Health Research Board’s Irish Alcohol Diaries 2013 report, more than 150,000 Irish people are dependent drinkers, more than a 1.35 million are harmful drinkers and 30% of people interviewed say that they experienced some form of harm as a result of their own drinking.

The report also reveals we underestimate what we drink by about 60%. If this is the case, the situation is much worse than what has been presented in the comprehensive report.

The question we need to ask ourselves is – how much is too much?

Carthy tells European Parliament – “Irish Water Charges will be defeated”

‘…to force the Irish people to pay 43% of the cost of the European banking crisis Dublin governments have introduced several new stealth taxes and charges that have caused devastation and hardship to many families.’

‘…people have had enough.’

Sligo News File Online.

Matt Carthy, MEP, Sinn Fein.
Matt Carthy, MEP, Sinn Fein.

Speaking during topical speeches in the European Parliament plenary in Strasbourg yesterday Sinn Féin MEP, Matt Carthy, told the chamber that the Irish people had suffered enough hardship
as a result of stealth charges and taxes. He predicted that the water charges in Ireland would be defeated.

Mr. Carthy said: “In order to force the Irish people to pay 43% of the cost of the European banking crisis Dublin governments have introduced several new stealth taxes and charges that have caused
devastation and hardship to many families.

“These taxes have not led to improved services; they have each been unfair and have targeted those on lower incomes disproportionately.

“Well, now the Irish people have had enough. In their tens and hundreds of thousands, Irish communities have joined together and marched against the latest tax on their families.

“The Irish government calls it a water charge – the Irish people see it for what it is – another tax that, if introduced, will put many people over the edge and will further hamper our domestic economies.

“That, under pressure, the government has now introduced temporary caps prove that this charge has nothing to do with water conservation but is just another attack on Irish families’ incomes.

“I want to take this opportunity to declare in the European Parliament, as it has been declared on streets of every Irish town – the water tax will be defeated and a new economic policy based on fairness and prosperity and against the austerity agenda will follow.”

Speaking after the plenary speeches, Carthy said that he believes that the proposed water charges scheme is not in keeping with the provisions of the EU Water Framework Directive and that he is awaiting responses from the European Commission on the issue.

“Article 9 of the European Water Framework Directive clearly states that any scheme for the recovery of water services costs must be based on the polluter pays principle and must contain an incentive for water conservation.

“The model proposed by the Irish Government – which introduces universal caps and grants not linked to water usage – undermines the environmental and water conservation principles which underpin the Directive.

“I have submitted a number of questions to the European Commission on this matter and I look forward to receiving their response in the very near future.”

“Sinn Féin remains opposed to the introduction of water charges, particularly as it is nothing other than a revenue raising exercise which will result in little to no investment in our water infrastructure, and we will continue to campaign against them in every forum available until they are successfully defeated.”

Bold Thinking Needed if Western Rail Corridor to Succeed – Dooley.

‘Providing a proper InterCity service from Cork to Galway via Limerick and Ennis would be a game changer for rail services in the West of Ireland.’

Sligo News File Online.

Timmy Dooley, TD., Fianna Fail.
Timmy Dooley, TD., Fianna Fail.

Fianna Fáil Spokesperson on Transport, Tourism and Sport Timmy Dooley TD has called on Irish Rail to engage in bold thinking in order to secure the future of the Western Rail Corridor. The call comes following reports that the Government is currently reviewing
the rail network with the possibility of line closures. Deputy Dooley believes that if a proper InterCity Service was established between Cork via Limerick and Ennis and ending in Galway it would dramatically improve passenger numbers on the line.

 Deputy Dooley stated, “The taxpayer has invested significantly in the Western Rail Corridor, yet Irish Rail is standing in the way of it maximising its true potential because of substandard timetables,
rolling stock and journey speeds on the line. Irish Rail needs to start thinking big and bold when it comes to the Western Rail Corridor. It’s time to create an Atlantic InterCity Rail Service with the same rolling stock that is used on all other InterCity routes, not the slow commuter trains which service the Limerick to Galway line.

“Providing a proper InterCity service from Cork to Galway via Limerick and Ennis would be a game changer for rail services in the West of Ireland. Given the strong passenger numbers that already
use commuter services on this route, an improved InterCity service would be of little extra cost but of huge potential benefit. The fact that you can’t get a direct train from Ireland’s second city to our third biggest city is an anomaly in any case. A reliable, fast and comfortable InterCity rail service connecting the three cities on the western seaboard is the solution to the challenge of low passenger numbers on the Western Rail Corridor. This kind of bold thinking is needed now more than ever in Irish Rail to secure the future of our rail network”.